Fortunate Son – Chapter 1 Novel Reading by Daniel T Pawlowski

Performed by Val Cole.

Get to know the writer:

What is your novel about?

Fortunate Son is the story of a future president lost in time. It is 1969. The Vietnam war is raging and a young G.W Bush decides the best place to be is in the National Guard.

Later, some would wonder as to his where-a-bouts during this period. This book answers the question . He was lost in time. A little “R and “R” , a party at Yale, a shortcut through the Physics lab and George gets sent back in time to 1787.

What is a future president to do? Seek help from the only expert in electricity at the time, Benjamin Franklin. The journey to visit Franklin is fraught with danger for anyone let alone the future president from the future. With Ben Franklins help George

attempts to return to his own time before he becomes AWOL from the National Guard, without derailing the writing of the U.S. Constitution and hopefully without getting George killed.

Full Synopsis: Synopsis: “Fortunate Son”

It was 1969. The summer of love had shot its wad and the Vietnam War was in full swing. It was not a good time to be in the military but George W Bush had put himself in a pretty good position to avoid any of that messy war stuff. With a little help from a powerful friend in politics, his Dad, he wangled a position in the National Guard.

Though the guard was treating him nicely, he still needed a little “R and R”, which is precisely why he headed to the campus of Yale University to party with his frat brothers from Delta Kappa Epsilon. As a brother and former fraternity president, he knew they would welcome him with open arms and more importantly open containers.

The party was a blast. Too bad he tried to take a shortcut through the Physics lab. That darned science complicates everything. An experiment in electromagnetism, a case of room zooms and a few hours later he finds himself lost in the year 1787. What is a future president to do? Seek help from the only expert in electricity at the time, Benjamin Franklin.

The journey to meet Franklin is fraught with danger. George has to rely on cunning and good luck, mostly good luck, to survive his encounters with highwaymen, local militia and a lesbian pirate. Fortunately for George he gets help from some folks he meets along the way and the physics students responsible for kicking off his little adventure. Discovering that their experiment had misplaced someone in time has the students concerned. When they find out whom the lost soul is they get serious and start pulling all-nighters to save George from time and visa versa. After many cheeseburgers, several cases of Yoo-Hoo and some choice pot, they manage to accidentally recruit help from 1787 when an unassuming farmer from the past is brought to the Yale campus of 1969.

George’s luck holds out and he manages to make it to Philadelphia to meet up with Ben Franklin. But it takes more than luck to convince Franklin that his story is not the fantastic imaginings of a mad man. It takes all of George’s charm plus the magic twinkle in his eye to convince Franklin that his predicament is real and his help is required. It doesn’t hurt that the constitutional convention of 1787 is just around the corner and the more Franklin leans about George, the more he is convinced that getting George the hell out of town would be a good idea.

Franklin agrees to help George get back to 1969 America. Unfortunately, George has created enemies along the way and they become intent on ending George’s time anywhere. The chase back to 1969 is on with George’s future and that of the country in the balance. When all seems lost and George’s timeline appears to be at an end, the Physics students manage to stay straight enough to solve their technical problems and bring George back to 1969.

Safely back from the past he escapes military justice and a charge of AWOL through cunning and, um, who am I kidding he concocts a story that he was working a political campaign for one of his dads buddies and surprisingly the Guard buys it.
The experience leaves George Bush a changed man. His black and white view of the world has changed into a nice shade of grey, his heart has grown softer and he ponders what he will be when he grows up.

What genres would you say this novel is in?

Fiction/Satire/Fantasy

How would you describe this story in two words?

Temporal Escapade.

What movie have you seen the most in your life?

Tough to answer accurately…….Blazing Saddles ?

How long have you been working on this story?

Eleven years.

Do you have an all-time favorite novel?

Candide by Voltair.

What motivated you to write this story?

The need to laugh at the political landscape

If you could have dinner with one person (dead or alive), who would that be?

Ben Franklin.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Tilting at social windmills.

What influenced you to enter your novel to get performed?

The need to bring laughter to a wider audience.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Believe in your journey, look at detours as educational, keep your eye on your destination.

*****

Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson

Best of 2016 COMEDY Novel Loglines

Submit your Novel to the Festival Today: https://novelwritingfestival.com

CLICK the LINK and read the best of 2016 COMEDY Novel Loglines: 

BARBIE AND THE BARBARIAN, by Racine Hiet

UP AND IN, by Deborah Disney

FORTUNATE SON, by Dan Pawlowski

SOUTHERN FRIED, by David Luck

ANNIE GOMEZ AND THE GIGANTIC FOOT OF DOOM, by Jay Cutts

PUSHING UPWARD, by Andrea Adler

THE TRUTH ABOUT CAROLINE, by Randi M. Sherman

DANCE OF LOVE, by Inge Saunders

THAT VOODOO THAT YOU DO, by Lorelei Delille

NOTHING LIKE NAKED, by MG Nash

A CLEAR SOLUTION, by Eric MacFarlane

50 ACTS OF KINDNESS, by Ellyn Oaksmith

ONE HOT SUMMER, by Ian Barker

ZEUS IS DEAD, by Michael G. Munz

COGRILLS MILL, by Jack Lindsay

THE ROAD TO JUSTICE, by David Carner

THE WEYLAND CHRONICLES, by Joe Cabello

DOES HARRY DREAM OF ELECTRIC SHEEP, by John Alston

DARK TIDINGS, by Ken Magee

MY TIME IS YOURS, by S.E. Isaac

YOU ARE AMONG MONSTERS, by Jon R. Flieger

Best of 2016 BIOGRAPHY Novel Loglines

Submit your Novel to the Festival Today: https://novelwritingfestival.com

CLICK the LINK and read the best of 2016 BIOGRAPHY Novel Loglines: 

WRONG PLACE WRONG TIME, by David P. Perlmutter

LUNA TREE: THE BABY PROJECT, by Maya Berger

THE MAVERICK EFFECT, by George Verdolaga

THE LION THE LEGEND AND THE COAL MINERS DAUGHTER, by Anne Mayhew

THE GIRL IN THE SHADOWS, by Kim Oshea

IT’S ALL ABOUT TRUST, by Sue Malcolm

A TURNKEY OR NOT, by Tony Levy

THE RABBIT CULTURES, by Antonio Capaldo

TEACHING FOR WHAT, by Michael J. Fusco

JOHARIS WINDOW, by Suzy Davies

ENCOUNTER IN NINEVEH, by Mahmoud Nafousi

RECOLLECTIONS OF MY LIFE, by John Findley

A SPECIAL GIFT, by Wanda Brown

WHO KILLED HONOR BRIGHT, by Patricia

LIFE ALIGNED WITH MARY MAGDALENE, by Renee Michelle Christian

JACK DAWKINS, by Charlton Daines

A WOMAN WITH NO STRINGS ATTACHED, by Lucie Novak

THEREALYOUTUBESTORY.com, by Eric Skaggs

TO FLY AGAIN: PORTRAIT OF A BIPOLAR LIFE, by Rachelle Hasnas

AS DARKER GROW THE SHADOWS, by MJ Roe

 

Watch Winning Novel Performance Readings:

November 2016 Novel & Short Story Winners

1st CHAPTER and FULL NOVEL FESTIVAL: https://novelwritingfestival.com/

Watch the November 2016 Winning Novel & Short Story Performance Readings. All stories read and performed by professional actors:

 

ACTORNovel Transcript – GUARDIAN
November 2016 Reading
Written by Marc W Johnson

ACTORNovel Transcript – HAIR DAY AT FRIDA’S
November 2016 Reading
Written by Rachel Sutton

ACTORNovel Transcript – BECOMING HERO
November 2016 Reading
Written by Jen Finelli

ACTORSHORT Story – SUPERMARKET SAVAGERY
November 2016 Reading
Written by Joan Grindley

ACTORSHORT Story – THE QUANDARY
November 2016 Reading
Written by Ann Barlow

ACTORSHORT Story – EMMA’S GIFT
November 2016 Reading
Written by Carolyn Reynolds

ACTORSHORT Story – SEQUOIA SEEDS
November 2016 Reading
Written by Mattheus Carpenter

ACTORSHORT Story – A CHRISTMAS REUNION
November 2016 Reading
Written by Joy Lin

ACTORSHORT Story – A GIFT OF VALUE
November 2016 Reading
Written by Nancy Janes

ACTORSHORT Story – PROBLEMS WITH MY MASTERCARD
November 2016 Reading
Written by Richard Kearns

ACTORSHORT Story – THE OLD MAN
November 2016 Reading
Written by Joseph Tsujimoto

ACTORSHORT Story – SMALL TOWN NEWSPAPER
November 2016 Reading
Written by Rachel Sutton

ACTORSHORT Story – HILDA’S LAMENT
November 2016 Reading
Written by Lionel Walfish

 

 

***
Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson

Interview with Novelist J.M. Bush (Storm in Shanghai)

J.M. Bush is the author of the urban fantasy novel, Storm in Shanghai. He began writing fiction in high school, but based on the negative reaction and mocking comments from an adult to one of his stories, J.M. lost confidence in his ability to write. He did not begin crafting new worlds again until March of 2015 – almost twenty years after he quit believing in himself. J.M. began writing online articles about traveling for the magazine Thursday Review. After spending four years living and working in Shanghai, China from 2011-2015, J.M. moved to Penang, Malaysia with his wife and two sons, where they currently reside. He still writes articles for the magazine, while also continuing to write science fiction and fantasy stories.

Go to his website: www.eatplaywritetravel.com

AMAZON PRINT AND KINDLE: http://amzn.to/1WMMrQo
BARNES & NOBLE PRINT AND NOOK: http://bit.ly/25l8OCc

storminInterview with J.M. Bush:

Matthew Toffolo: What is the general theme and tone of your novel?

J.M. Bush: The general theme of my novel is the fight against evil, and yet in that fight you may be called upon to do the unthinkable to achieve this goal. To save the lives of your family and friends, and to stop the murder of countless innocent people, what should the hero be willing to do in order to accomplish this? The book also deals with the idea of how someone becomes evil. How does a good person go bad? Storm in Shanghai is told through first person POV present tense in some chapters , first person POV past tense of the same character in other chapters, and finally in third person past tense of some other characters in other chapters. The tone of each is different, but ranges from witty and happy to angry and scared.

MT: Why should people buy your novel?

JMB: People should buy my book if they want a new take on magic set in the real world, an engaging mystery where cops seek the identity of a mysterious killer to put a stop to their murderous rampage, lots of action and spell fighting, and fantastic characters like a punk rock Chinese girl who shoots fire dragons from her hands at her enemies, a 300 year old Scottish man who drinks like a fish and sucks at magic, and a mysterious figure clad in black that can do things with magic no one has ever seen before.

MT: How would you describe your novels in just two words?

JMB: Magical Mystery!

MT: What movie have you seen the most in your life?

JMB: Big Trouble in Little China

MT: Was being a novel writer something you’ve always dreamed of doing?

JMB: I used to like writing as a kid and was turned off after being mocked by an adult. It wasn’t until a year ago, in March of 2015 that I decided to take on writing novels. I have since finished three, and Storm in Shanghai is my first to be published. If I knew back then what I know now (cliche, I know) I would never have given up writing. It is such a relief to put words on paper and see them enjoyed by other people. But even more so than that, the feeling of pride I get when I read my own stuff is the real reward; to know that I am actually good at this and no one will ever make me doubt that again, no matter what they say.

MT: Do you have an all-time favorite novel?

JMB: Have you read a novel more than once? I am terrible at picking favorites! The Chronicles of Narnia series by C.S. Lewis had a huge impact on me as a kid. I read the entire series once a year for many, many years in a row. I eventually stopped, and I don’t even know why. But I have two Narnia tattoos, both from The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, so I guess it’s safe to say that is my favorite novel. But I read most novels I love more than once. The Icewind Dale Trilogy by R.A. Salvatore comes to mind. I’ve read those three books sooooo many times. They are perfect. I also love the rest of the Companions Saga, and all the Drizzt stuff. Oh, and every book Michael Crichton wrote would be on the list of books I’ve read over and over. I just love the way he wrote about science. He researched the hell out of his subject and ended up making me believe it was true.

MT: What motivates you to write?

JMB: There is a movie constantly playing in my mind. It changes all the time, but whatever is happening on that mental silver screen feels even better once I put it on paper and form it into something that makes sense. The motivation for me is finding out what happens in that movie in my head. Because it is always changing, I never get to see the end unless I write it!

MT: What artist would you love to have dinner with?

JMB: Oh dear me. This is a tough one. At the moment, I would probably say R.A. Salvatore so we could hopefully play some D&D after dinner.

MT: Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

JMB: My family is everything to me. I have an incredible wife and two crazy boys. I modeled the character Kelly, the wife of the MC in my book, on my wife Merissa. And I used her name for another character, I just changed it slightly. My boys also inspired the sons of the MC in my book, as I named them after Star Wars characters. My oldest is named Lucas and my youngest’s middle name is Han. So, I guess I’m pretty passionate about Star Wars, too! In addition to that, I love playing music. I have been in several punk rock bands over the years, most recently in China, where we played all the time and in many places throughout the Middle Kingdom. I love to sing and play bass, but I find writing music so much more difficult than writing a 100k word novel!

MT: Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

JMB: Yes, for sure. First, don’t let what anyone else tells you make you feel like a bad writer. Taking constructive criticism is one thing; beta readers can offer amazing insight to how your book comes across to different people, and an editor is essential for creating a sharp and focused book. Take constructive criticism to heart and use it to better your writing. But people that just spew hate and filth about your writing? Just brush those people off. Their opinions do not matter and should not affect you. Have faith in your ability, and believe in your ideas. YOUR IDEAS ARE AWESOME. Don’t be discouraged by rejection letters. Don’t worry about whether or not your book will be a best seller. Just write the story you want to tell, and the people that want to read it will eventually get to do so.

____

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go to http://www.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.